Labrador Destroys Over $2,000 Cash in Video: ‘Who Wants Her’

A very naughty labrador retriever named Zoey is in the doghouse this week after destroying over $2,000 in cash. The aftermath can be seen in a video seen over 2 million times.

The video, posted Sunday evening by TikTok user @KimKruk, shows the fallout of Zoey’s destruction, soundtracked by @KimKruk softly crying.

“When you leave your lab alone for two hours and she manages to get to the cash on top of the table and ate about 2 grand…. Who wants her LMAO #labradorretriever #rip,” @KimKruk wrote in the caption to the video seen over 2.8 million times.

On Monday evening, she posted a second video to explain what happened in more detail.

@kimkruk

Replying to @libra.mya888 quick little update to everyone asking what happened 🙃 going to try to go to the bank this week to see what we can get back! Will post more videos of Zoey 🥰

♬ original sound – Kim

“The video was kind of [an] in-the-moment kind of thing, and I’m going to explain exactly what happened. Since a lot of people are asking, my husband works this whole weekend. Actually, I barely saw him this weekend. It was a side job. And he works construction,” she said.

In the clip she explains that when her husband got home from work, he put the $2,700 cash that he was paid on the dining room table, before a quick shower and change of clothes. While he’s at home getting ready, @KimKruk is visiting her parents’. After changing, he walked Zoey before joining his wife.

“Zoey really never reaches on top of our dining room table. She sometimes tries to look over our kitchen countertops to try to get to food, so we know not to leave food around or anything like that, because she’ll probably try to eat it but we never thought that she would try to eat paper or let alone money,” she said.

The happy couple spent a couple hours visiting, and then drove home in their separate cars. @KimKruk says she got there about five minutes before her husband, and she happened to see a torn $100 bill on the floor.

“I immediately got really upset with [Zoey] and you know, $100 is $100. For us it’s a lot of money. So I immediately went to go to the sofa to sit down and you know kind of talk to her and make sure that she understood that that was not OK. And when I get to the sofa is when I see all of the money that she had eaten and ripped up into tiny, tiny pieces,” @KimKruk said.

Of the original $2,700, Zoey had destroyed all but $300, she said. The rest of the money had been “shred to pieces,” and @KimKruk says Zoey probably ate some of the money as well.

“I immediately started freaking out, started crying and that’s when my husband arrived. And he also almost had a heart attack. And that’s when I made the video,” she said. “I thought it would be funny to send to my, like, family members, my friends and I decided to post it on Tik Tok and here we are.

“But I am not upset at her. She’s a dog. She doesn’t understand what she did. And hopefully tomorrow we will be able to get some of the money back,” @KimKruk concluded.

labrador destroy money tiktok video viral dog
Zoey, a labrador like the one in this stock photo, destroyed over $2,000 in cash when she was left alone on Sunday night.
iStock/Getty Images

While cash isn’t a typical staple of the labrador diet, sometimes money gets destroyed. Luckily, that doesn’t always mean that the money is completely gone. The most common ways for money to be damaged—or what the U.S. Treasury calls “mutilated”—are fire, water, deterioration from burying or animals, the Treasury says.

The Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing has procedures for replacing damaged money. If over 50 percent of a note is present, along with remnants of any security feature on the bill—for example, the watermark—it can be replaced at the full value.

However, if less than half of a note is available, all isn’t lost. The remains of the bill along with supporting evidence that demonstrates the rest of the bill has been totally destroyed—like, say, being devoured by a dog—the full value of the bill will still be replaced. That said, it’s up to the Bureau’s discretion whether or not any given mutilated note reaches this standard.

There are exceptions to this, though. Generally, if there’s a crime committed—whether or not it is a specific attempt to defraud the U.S., the Bureau says, the money will not be refunded. In that case, the damaged money will either be fully destroyed or used as evidence. Also, if the remnants aren’t identifiable as money, they won’t make the refund, no matter how much someone insists it was really cash at one point.

The Bureau takes submissions of mutilated currency from both individuals and organizations. For those seeking to be compensated for destroyed money, local banks can generally handle the exchange.

Going to the bank is precisely what most commenters urged @KimKruk to do.

“I work at a bank mama , just tape it all back and go to the bank for exchange,” @libra.mya888 wrote.

“take it to the bank to get replaced!!” @isssaydie added.

“Banks take damaged bills!!” @gayforchips wrote.

Aside from advice on how @KimKruk could get the money back, there were many jokes about the situation.

“[Dog Emoji] said MONEY AINT A THANGGG,” @unh0rny wrote.

“The lab is like yup that was all me,” @meanmatchine1 wrote.

Newsweek reached out to @KimKruk and the U.S. Treasury for comment.

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