Dog Digging in Owner’s Backyard Unearths Human Remains: Police

A dog digging in a Missouri backyard has uncovered skeletal human remains, according to police.

The Kansas City Police Department (KCPD) said officers were alerted to reports of human remains being found at a home in the 5600 block of Paloma at about 10 a.m. on Sunday.

Police said the resident told officers his dog had been digging in the backyard and that the remains were soon uncovered, according to CBS affiliate KCTV.

According to the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs), 600,000 people of all ages across the U.S. go missing every year.

Stock image of a police car
Stock image of a police car. The human remains were found in a Kansas City backyard.
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NamUs added some 4,400 unidentified bodies are recovered across the U.S. each year.

KCPD contacted detectives who have launched a suspicious death investigation, according to the network.

Crime scene investigators and the medical examiner’s office will process evidence from the backyard and will determine a cause of death.

No information about the deceased’s age, gender, or time of death was released to the public on Sunday.

It is not known how long the remains had been in the Kansas City backyard for, KCTV reported.

Anyone with information or tips is asked to call the homicide unit at 816-234-5043 or the TIPS hotline anonymously at 816-474-TIPS.

Newsweek has contacted the KCPD for comment.

This year, numerous human remains have been found in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

And earlier this month, the National Park Service received reports of a missing woman on October 15. The 39-year-old had last been seen at the back of Katherine Landing Marina on Lake Mohave, part of the recreation area.

A body was found in Lake Mohave the following day, the woman was not wearing a life jacket according to investigators.

Lake Mead, a huge reservoir in Nevada and Arizona, has made headlines following several grisly discoveries. Plummeting water levels linked to an ongoing drought revealed numerous human remains in the lake.

In May, human remains were found inside a barrel that is thought to be linked to a gang-related murder.

Since being created in the 1930s, Lake Mead has claimed the lives of some 300 people who have drowned in the reservoir. That figure is in addition to other bodies found in the lake that might have died from other causes.

While the lake can be tempting to visitors, it is 100 feet deep and covers some 28 surface acres, according to the National Park Service.

A park service spokesperson previously told Newsweek: “Drownings are the number one cause of unintentional deaths at Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

“Many of these could have been prevented if people were wearing life jackets.”

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